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An identical decree was adopted by the Second Council of the Province of Australia in 1869, but Propaganda did not sanction it and declared that the matter should preferably be determined by the various diocesan synods.

In the Province of Halifax, Canada, it was decreed in 1857 that a collection be taken up annually in October for the support of the bishops.In England, the Third Provincial Council of Westminster in 1859 placed the amount of the cathedraticum at one half pound sterling.In Canada, the Provincial Council of Halifax in 1857 declares: "As the bishop is constituted not for one part but for all parts of his diocese, and as he labours and watches for all alike, all are obliged to contribute for his proper sustenance".The Second Plenary Council of Baltimore in 1866, likewise states that "it is evidently equitable and just that all the faithful of each diocese should contribute to the support of their bishop, who bears the solicitude for all".The revenue in question is declared to be made up of the pew rents, the collections during Divine service and the funeral stipends.

Finally the diocesan arrangement for the cathedraticum has been declared by Propaganda (as in 1872) to be a binding law on those whom it concerns. All materials contained on this site, whether written, audible or visual are the exclusive property of Catholic Online and are protected under U. and International copyright laws, © Copyright 2017 Catholic Online.

It declared that the liability to pay this tax was obligatory on each cathedral chapter; on priests ordained for the mission, who receive salaries from churches or oratories ; on those who have the cure of souls ; and on all who preside over churches and public oratories unless they can prove a special exemption.

In the United States, the Eighth Provincial Council of Baltimore, when vindicating the right of the bishop to part of the revenues of the churches, enumerates as such revenues, the renting of pews, the collections taken up during Mass, and the offerings made at baptisms and marriages.

As a consequesce, different methods of computing the cathedraticum prevail throughout the United States.

In one prominent diocese, for example, the rector of each church must pay one-fifth of his revenue if it exceed one thousand dollars, or one-third if it be less.

According to canonists, this remains the obligatory amount of the tax, unless custom establishes a different sum. The regular clergy are not obliged to pay the cathedraticum for their monasteries and conventual churches, as is expressly stated in the "Corpus Juris" (cap. As exempt regulars are immediately subject to the Holy See, there is no obligation on them to pay the cathedraticum.