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Check the formula syntax that appears as you start typing in the function, to make sure the function has the required arguments.

Excel throws a variety of hash (#) errors such as #VALUE! Excel displays the above dialog box to make sure that the formulas in the current spreadsheet always point to the most updated value, in case the reference value has changed.You can choose to update the references, or skip if you don't want to update.Instead of entering

Excel throws a variety of hash (#) errors such as #VALUE! Excel displays the above dialog box to make sure that the formulas in the current spreadsheet always point to the most updated value, in case the reference value has changed.

You can choose to update the references, or skip if you don't want to update.

Instead of entering $1,000, enter 1000 in the formula.

If you use formatted numbers in arguments, you’ll get unexpected calculation results, but you may also see the #NUM! For example, if you enter the formula =ABS(-2,134) to find the absolute value of -2134, Excel shows the #NUM!

The fix is to either move the formula to another cell or change the formula syntax, one that avoids circular references.

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Excel throws a variety of hash (#) errors such as #VALUE! Excel displays the above dialog box to make sure that the formulas in the current spreadsheet always point to the most updated value, in case the reference value has changed.You can choose to update the references, or skip if you don't want to update.Instead of entering $1,000, enter 1000 in the formula.If you use formatted numbers in arguments, you’ll get unexpected calculation results, but you may also see the #NUM! For example, if you enter the formula =ABS(-2,134) to find the absolute value of -2134, Excel shows the #NUM!The fix is to either move the formula to another cell or change the formula syntax, one that avoids circular references.

,000, enter 1000 in the formula.If you use formatted numbers in arguments, you’ll get unexpected calculation results, but you may also see the #NUM! For example, if you enter the formula =ABS(-2,134) to find the absolute value of -2134, Excel shows the #NUM!The fix is to either move the formula to another cell or change the formula syntax, one that avoids circular references.

However, in some scenarios you may need circular references because they cause your functions to iterate—repeat until a specific numeric condition is met.For example, the formula ="Today is " & TEXT(TODAY(),"dddd, mmmm dd") combines the text "Today is " with the results of the TEXT and TODAY functions, and returns say something like Today is Monday, May 30.In the formula, "Today is " has a space before the ending quotation mark to provide the blank space you want between the words "Today is" and "Monday, May 30." Without quotation marks around the text, the formula might show the #NAME? When you type a reference to values or cells in another worksheet, and the name of that sheet has a non-alphabetical character (such as a space), enclose the name in single quotation marks (').You'll return to the cell with the broken formula, which will be in edit mode, and Excel will highlight the spot where it’s having a problem.If you still don’t know what to do from there and want to start over, you can press ESC again, or click the Cancel button in the formula bar, which will exit you out of edit mode. , to indicate something in your formula is not working right. error is caused by incorrect formatting, or unsupported data types in arguments. error if a formula refers to cells that have been deleted or replaced with other data.If you’re not sure what to do at this point or what kind of help you need, you can search for similar questions in the Excel Community Forum, or post one of your own. Troubleshooting guidance will differ for each error.